To Growing Up and Staying Young – 17

party ballons

With warm summer air surrounding us and the sounds of the crickets drifting in through my open window, I curled into my mother’s body and she hugged me to her; though I may be bigger than I was on the day I was born, exactly seventeen years ago, I will forever be her little baby and she will always be my mother.

She told me last year that as she turned seventeen, she was sad to part with sixteen. Today, I understand the way she felt then. Though sixteen might not have been exactly glamorous or particularly spectacular, it will forever hold a special place in my heart.

A lot has changed this year. I gained freedom, in a way, because I started and completed the whole process of learning how to drive and getting my license. Finally, something that everyone my age is tackling and mastering, and I could participate just liked everyone else. I even mastered it quickly and well, if I do say so myself. I probably annoy people a lot at this point when I talk about driving, but it’s fun to be the expert and the sage around my friends (I’m one of the only ones who can drive so far) on a topic unrelated to medical things.

The way I think about things has changed, drastically. I just approach things in a better way now. I keep up my positive thinking and I’ve developed an inner sense of humor that I’ve always had into a shield and a mood booster. I see humor in a lot of places I didn’t use to see it, and I cherish that change. It’s a change for the better.

I’m also more cautious, in a way, but at the same time I dare myself to do things I never would have done a year ago. I’m cautious with what I say and how much I share, not for fear of hurting someone else’s feelings, but for fear of sharing thoughts and feelings that I’m not yet sure about. I used to just blurb out whatever I was thinking, but now I take the time to actually form my thoughts before speaking and weigh the weight of what I’m sharing and how frustrated I will get if I can’t explain myself properly.

But I also take myself out of my comfort zone: I go places alone, I call people and talk on the phone, I do the things I know I should do but always feel awkward doing. I’ve just developed this way of approaching things and talking myself through them, and it’s starting to feel like I can tackle the things that have always intimidated me. I’m starting from the smaller things, like those I mentioned earlier, and at some point I will have the courage to face the bigger ones.

I also made the switch from thinking of all of the things I would like to do to actually doing them. I do more than talk, nowadays. Take, for example, my horrendous lack in general knowledge. For a bunch of years now I’ve been saying that I don’t know how I’ve been in school for so many years and yet there are basic things that I don’t know. This year, I just started educating myself. I bought a book called “The Knowledge Book”, and I read it before bed.

I’m just very aware of how I’m changing and how I’m learning to accept myself more and more. That’s another major change this year, my self-confidence. It’s been hard learning to accept my body with all that it puts me through, and that affected my self-confidence for a long time. But I’ve somehow learned how to separate fibromyalgia from my body, and because of that I’m learning to accept and like the way I look.

It’s exhilarating to realize that I’m getting older and there’s a whole new world of opportunities opening ahead of me, and absolutely terrifying at the same time. I’m sad to lose the feeling of being a child, of being protected by these strong and kind parents who are nothing but my parents. It’s huge to realize and to process that parents are people too, and to think of them as people before parents, but important. You do lose something though with that realization, because you can never go back. On the on hand, I still want them to take care of me and be there all the time, but at the same time the independent woman in me is showing her true colors and I just can’t wait to get out there in the world.

I’m sure it won’t be easy, but with every passing day I feel more and more ready to do it. To live life.

I propose a toast, to growing up and staying young forever.

 

Yours truly,

Ella

 

Song Quote:

Time may change me, but I can’t trace time. –Changes, David Bowie

 

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The Tale of Friendship

Once upon a time, there was a maiden named Ella. On a fine summer day, she met a maiden named Beatrice. Though the two did not know it at the time, they were destined to become the best of friends.

Time went as time goes, and the girls grew closer and closer, until the day came when a big dark cloud floated over Ella’s kingdom while the two were playing. Ella was at a loss, and she surely did not know what to do with herself. Beatrice, however, was not at a loss. Beatrice had Google.

Beatrice’s kingdom was just a decurtate walk away, and after seeing the dark cloud presiding below the heavens, she sprinted to her domain. She sat in her garden, turned her head up to the periwinkle blue skies, and said, “Please Google, tell me what Ella’s big dark cloud means!”

Google’s booming voice pulsated in the air around her and made her hair flutter around her face, but Beatrice sat calmly and listened to Google’s candid answer: “My dear, the dark cloud means many things for Ella. For you, Beatrice, it means this: Ella is going to need a friend. It will probably be hard, and it will probably be forlorn at times. It is up to you what you do next.”

Beatrice stayed seated for many a minute. She had some thinking to do. At last, she knew what she must do. Beatrice went up to her attic palace, and retrieved the things she would need. She heaved the satchel she had assembled over her shoulder, and a short while later she was back at Ella’s dwelling, where she found Ella on the seesaw in her backyard. It was so dark Beatrice couldn’t even see the empty seat on the other end of the seesaw, only Ella’s pale white face illuminated by the tears streaming down it.

“Ella, I’m here. Can you see me?”

“Beatrice, is that you?” Ella exclaimed, turning her head wildly from side to side, searching for her darling friend.

“Undoubtedly.” Beatrice reached her hand into her satchel, and pulled out the fairy flashlight she had brought with her. It had been a gift from her godmother. She flipped the switch, and rays of light shone all around the friends.

“Beatrice!” Ella exclaimed as she stumbled off the seesaw and rushed to receive a hug from her friend’s endless supply. “I haven’t been able to get off that seesaw for forever. It’s just up and down, up and down. Thank you!”

“There’s more, Ella,” Beatrice said, as she reached her hand back into the sublime satchel. She pulled out a box of homemade confections, a music player full of the very best songs one could ever find, a stack of gazettes brimming with hunky dory pictures and outrageous accounts of cults sure to distract even the gloomiest of girls, and fancy cutlery fit for kings. (Because who doesn’t need cutlery?)

The maidens giggled and guffawed the hours away, day after day. The big dark cloud continues to shift and sway until today, though it never leaves. But, every minute that the girls spend together, the less frightening the big dark cloud becomes, and the more heart to hearts the girls have, the closer they become.

This is how the tale of friendship goes. In every corner of our world, when one lifts their head up to the sky and says, “Please Google, tell me what friendship means”, the response they get starts like this:

“Once upon a time, there was a maiden named Ella. On a fine summer day, she met a maiden named Beatrice. Though the two did not know it at the time, they were destined to become the best of friends.”

FIN

 


Happy birthday, Beatrice. You deserve the very best of everything. You will always have my love and my support. Be joyous.

driving terrifies people birthday

 

Good Knowledge (as Beatrice would say),

Ella

 

Song Quote:

I hope you find the love that’s true, so the morning light can shine on you. I hope you find what you’re looking for, so your heart is warm forever more. –Shine, Benjamin Francis Leftwich